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Watching "The Conjuring"
Published on July 30, 2013 by Sara Foss

Over at the DG, I review the new horror movie "The Conjuring."

Here's an excerpt:

"I don’t scare easily, at least not at the movies, and I didn’t find the new horror film 'The Conjuring' especially scary, despite all the hype about how terrifying it is.

But as a period piece, domestic drama, thriller and insightful depiction of an unusual profession — paranormal investigation — I found the film pretty compelling. This is a well-crafted, deeply involving movie that, in an age of irony and horror-comedy, is distinguished by a heartfelt sincerity. Unlike most horror films, 'The Conjuring' doesn’t have a gratuitous bone in its body. You might not believe in the supernatural, but 'The Conjuring' certainly does, and the film’s earnestness makes it surprisingly easy to buy into the idea that demonic possession is a real threat to the American way of life.

Supposedly based-on-true events, 'The Conjuring' concerns real-life paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga), a married couple who believe they were brought together by God to help people plagued by evil spirits. Lorraine is a gifted clairvoyant who finds their work important, but taxing; Ed would like her to take a break, but she refuses. After giving a lecture, the couple is approached by Carolyn Perron (Lili Taylor). Perron, her husband Roger (Ron Livingston) and their five daughters are convinced that the old farmhouse they recently moved into is haunted; they hear footsteps at odd hours, birds fly into the side of the house and die, their clocks always stop at the same time — 3:07 — and one of the daughters is attacked by a hateful spirit who resembles an old woman. The Warrens are skeptical, but agree to visit the house. As soon as they set foot on the property, they sense that something is very wrong and agree to collect evidence to present to the Vatican so that an exorcism can be performed, if necessary."

Click here to read the whole thing.

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